Car crash victims in Cincinnati, Ohio may suffer a shoulder injury, one of the more common of which is called shoulder impingement syndrome. You yourself may have suffered from a severe case of this and are wondering if you can file a claim to be compensated for your losses. First, it can be good to know the nature of this injury.

Where the shoulder can be injured

First of all, the shoulder joint is made up of three bones called the humerus, clavicle and scapula. At the top of the joint is a bony projection called the acromion. A group of muscles and tendons called the rotator cuff wraps around the shoulder joint. By suffering an injury in a car crash, you may have torn this rotator cuff and had it rub against the acromion.

The force of the impact causes rotational forces to go through the arm and shoulder, especially if the driver has braced the arm on the steering wheel. The result is serious pain. Note that there can be such a thing as asymptomatic shoulder impingement syndrome, caused by the age-related degeneration of the shoulder joint.

A wide range of treatment options

The treatment for shoulder impingement syndrome will likely be conservative at first. An ice or heat treatment, or perhaps some anti-inflammatory drugs, will reduce the swelling that one would experience. Then, to increase one’s range of motion and build up strength in the muscles, the doctor may recommend physical therapy. This could be combined with therapeutic massages and chiropractic care.

More extensive treatments may include cortisone shots to the shoulder and surgery. Any bone spurs may have to be shaved off to open up the space between the acromion and the rotator cuff.

Seeking compensation with legal help

When car accidents are clearly the result of the other driver’s negligence, victims are entitled to compensation. You may want a lawyer to help you file your claim and negotiate on your behalf for a reasonable settlement, one that covers medical treatment costs, pain and suffering, lost wages and more. The lawyer may assist with litigation, too, if things come to that.