Social Security Disability Insurance benefits are for working adults only, so your child cannot get them on his or her own. However, he or she may be eligible for benefits in another way. To get SSDI, a person has to have a work history and meet work requirements. If your child is too young or has a disability and has never worked, then he or she cannot get SSDI on his or her own record. The only way your child could get benefits is to use your record.

According to the Social Security Administration, if your child becomes disabled prior to the age of 22, he or she may be eligible for SSDI benefits. Your child can be a minor or adult to receive benefits on your record as long as he or she meets the eligibility requirements.

Eligibility

Beyond the requirement for the disability to occur before your child reaches age 22, you or the child’s other parent must have enough work credits to qualify for benefits and be deceased or must currently receive SSDI or retirement. In addition, he or she must meet the SSA’s definition of disability.

Other information

In addition to the SSDI monthly payments, your child may also be able to get work training and other assistance. He or she will also be able to save money to attend college without it affecting his or her benefits.

Your child will remain eligible under your record until he or she has substantial earnings from employment. Also, if your child marries, then this might affect his or her eligibility for continued benefits.