As a parent or school administrator in Ohio, it can be difficult for you to recognize when bullying is going on among young people. Even when you recognize that bullying is happening, you may feel powerless to stop it. Nevertheless, it is important for adults in authority to take action against bullying.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the effects of bullying on children can be both negative and severe. Furthermore, it is not only the victims of bullying who experience the negative effects but also the bullies themselves.

Effects on bullies

Contrary to what many may believe, bullying is not usually a phase that children grow out of. Engaging in bullying behavior as a child is a warning sign that the individual may continue to exhibit aggressive behavior as an adult. Child bullies may grow up to be domestic abusers. Despite the fact that the law limits the ability to take legal action against a minor for bullying, as child bullies become adults, they may become involved in physical altercations that result in criminal convictions and possible prison time.

Effects on victims of bullying

Kids who are the targets of bullying can develop both psychological and physical problems. Examples include anxiety, depression and health complaints. When school becomes a hostile environment, children may be more reluctant to attend. Even if they do attend, they may become more reluctant to participate. As a result, school performance may suffer.

If you suspect that a child may be a victim of bullying, some signs to watch for include loss of interest in activities, changes in appetite and trouble sleeping. It is important to address these signs, as they will not necessarily go away on their own once the child grows up.

The information in this article is not intended as legal advice but provided for educational purposes only.